3rd International Artist Residency Comes to Long Island

THIS ESSAY HAS BEEN PUBLISHED IN THE NOVEMBER 2016 ISSUE OF ACES MAGAZINE

For the third time in five years, the Islip Art Museum brought a group of international artists to Long Island for it’s two-week long New York Contemporary Art Symposium (NYCAS). Unlike previous residencies, which included artists from around the world, NYCAS 2016 focused on a specific country, bringing five Chilean artists to New York from September 19 to October 3. For this year’s residency, the Islip Art Museum collaborated with International Meeting of Art, a global non-profit organization dedicated to the arts and cultural exchange while encouraging, supporting, and facilitating the possibility for artists of all mediums and different cultures to work together. The 2016 NYCAS artists included Andrés Achavar, Ignacio Castillo, Paloma Gómez, Marcela Zamorano González, and Nico Huidobro. Like previous residencies, the participants were invited to exhibit their artwork across Long Island and experience all that New York culturally has to offer.

The residency featured a group of artists working in a variety of mediums. Andrés Achavar is a fine watercolorist whose work focuses on the beauty of the everyday. His paintings capture the essence of his subject matters that occupy a brief moment of time, as each work is bathed in a rich atmospheric light that encapsulates its setting. His figures are expressionless, devoid of individualistic features, as they go about their everyday-activities in urban and sub-urban street scenes or interior settings that project a moment plucked from time, forever frozen in watercolor.

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Andrés Achavar, West 20th Street, 2016

Ignacio Castillo’s work is a reaction to the increasing industrialization of his hometown of Santiago City. His small-scale ceramic sculptures rise from the grounds in which they are fired. Some figures tower over the smaller ones, casting them in shadows. These figures, like Achavar’s, are featureless, standing representative of the everyman. His subject matter is not the figures themselves, but the expressions and emotions they project through their poses, gestures, and colors.

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Ignacio Castillo, Art Energetic Gnapo, 2016

Working in oil paint, Paloma Gómez’s subject matter alternates between the abstract and the representational. She is inspired by the relationships between man and their environments as well as their interpersonal interactions. For the basis of each painting, she uses her own sketches, photographs and imagination as references. She builds up the layers of her compositions with vibrant colors until she feels each canvas is complete. Her Headphones and Nocturno series captures sub-urban street scenes at night with her figures and landscapes saturated in the afterglow of street laps that dance across the night sky. Although painted on a squared piece of canvas, her compositions are circular as if the scene is viewed through a hole in a screen.

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Paloma Gómez, Headphones XIV, 2016

In her photography, Marcela Zamorano González turns her camera lens towards what is often overlooked. Broken bottles, graffiti riddled buildings, and the average passerby are all subjects utilized by the artist as she structures her compositions with strong vertical and horizontal lines that zigzag across the picture plane. By turning her attention to the mundane, the artist draws attention to the hidden beauty of the world around her, highlighting it for all to see while urging the viewers to be observant of their surroundings as well.

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Marcela Zamorano González, Untitled, 2015

In his artwork, Nico Huidobro utilizes expression as an interpretive medium with which he attempts to concentrate on the present moment and current happenings of his surroundings. His paintings are visual expressions of his reactions towards music, the people around him, and the conditions of his environment. His works are impulsive and whimsical, created on the fly or at a moment’s notice.

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Nico Huidobro, Untitled, 2016

NYCAS 2016, an Islip Art Museum and International Meeting of Art Collaboration, is a two-week long, international artist residency program based in East Islip, NY. The bi-annual residency seeks to encourage and improve the cultural exchange between participating artists and collaborating communities. In 2016, the Islip Art Museum hosted five Chilean artists working in a variety of mediums from September 19 to October 3. These artists exhibited their paintings, photographs, and sculpture at the Islip Art Museum, Second Avenue Firehouse Gallery in Bay Shore, and the Patchogue Arts Gallery throughout September and October. Additionally, their work is currently on display in the exhibition Made in Chile at Toast Coffeehouse in Patchogue until December 28.

Jay Schuck


Photo Credits
Images of Paloma Gómez and Marcela Zamorano González artwork courtesy of Patchogue Arts Council

Images of Andrés Achavar, Ignacio Castillo, and Nico Huidobro artwork courtesy of Islip Art Museum

Remembering Things Past at Islip Art Museum

On view at the Islip Art Museum is Remembering Things Past, which features foreign-born artists that are presently living and working in the United States. The artists presented in the exhibition arrived at different points in their lives and at different stages in their artistic career.

Linda Abadjian arrived in 1984 as a child escaping the long fought Lebanese Civil War. The works in the exhibition were created after the artist’s first trip back to Lebanon in 2005. The bombed out buildings, interior scenes, and landscapes of the country reflect the state of her childhood home which was damaged during the war and has fallen into disrepair. After her return and upon reflecting on her recent experience, Abadjian was moved to work in a new way and began drawing with her opposite hand. Despite exposing the destruction of war in her mixed media works, Abadjian examines a new hope for the future rising from the ashes of its war-torn past.

Linda Abadjian, Stairway to Our Playground, 2006

Linda Abadjian, Stairway to Our Playground, 2006

Pablo Caviedes received his formal education in Ecuador before coming to the United States. His skull and bone sculptures show the artist recalling past experiences of collecting animal bones while exploring the Andes Mountains. These old bones, polished by time and nature, sparked Caviedes’ artistic interest by offering the deceased creature new life in art. The works whether skull or vertebrae are embellished with resin, adding unrealistic elements that are seamlessly incorporated.

Pablo Caviedes, This Makes My Mouth Water, 1999

Pablo Caviedes, This Makes My Mouth Water, 2002

Cui Fei earned a BFA from Zhejian Academy of Fine Arts in China before receiving a MFA from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. As a Chinese artist active in the United States, she witnessed the rapid social changes taking place in China from afar while having to adapt to a radically new American culture. Her installation Manuscript of Nature, based on Chinese calligraphy, fuses the Chinese conception of nature, which emphasizes the interconnectedness of all living creatures, with the Western theory of Transculturalism, the notion of finding oneself within all human cultures.

Cui Fei, Manuscript of Nature (detail), 2014

Cui Fei, Manuscript of Nature (detail), 2014

Romanian artist Ana Golici brought with her to the United States 36 years ago, a fascination with natural forms. In her Icon series, Golici replaces the Christian iconography of traditional Eastern European icon paintings, a staple in many Romanian homes since the Middle Ages, with microscopic biological imagery in hand made gilded frames.

Ana Golici, Icon I, 2014

Ana Golici, Icon I, 2014

Taiwanese artist Anti Liu grew up in a time when war between China and Taiwan seemed imminent. After completing a BFA at the National Taiwan University of Arts, he came to America where he pursued his MFA studies at Long Island University. Liu’s work pokes fun at current events and today’s political climate, recognizing the severity of these issues while presenting them in a playful manner. His sculpture fuses his Asian heritage with pop culture imagery of the West.

Anti Liu, Baby Pillow, 2011

Anti Liu, Baby Pillow, 2011

Meleko Mokgosi’s art education straddled two continents, beginning in his native Botswana and continuing in the United States. In his text-based series, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages, he addresses the problematic re-inscriptions of colonial discourse. The series is based on the exhibition African Art, New York, and the Avant-Garde that was on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2012. Here the artist is responding to the museum labels, the primary source of information for the general public. Each panel consists of printed text resembling large-scale museum labels for African artifacts, apparently looted during colonization. The artist then adds notes and revisions to the labels, critiquing the structure in how museumgoers would understand the material.

Meleko Mokgosi, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages III, 2012 - 2014

Meleko Mokgosi, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages III, 2012 – 2014

In his artwork, Canadian born Jason Paradis incorporates memories of his time in the vast northern wilderness. In Dead Man’s Bay, the artist presents the viewer with a star constellation the artist would have seen while gazing out at the nighttime sky while on a camping trip. Like natural constellations in the sky, the painting inspires a feeling that there is something much larger in existence than our immediate world.

Jason Paradis, Dead Man's Bay, 2011

Jason Paradis, Dead Man’s Bay, 2011

Through imagery derived from Pre-Columbian sources, Mexican born artist, Filiberto Perez takes a critical view on social, political issues found in the States and his native Mexico as he strives to deconstruct long held cultural beliefs. In Serpiente Emplumada, Perez takes on the subject of the Feathered Serpent, a divine creature rooted in prehistoric Mesoamerican societies. Here, the artist takes familiar visual symbols of the serpent, such as the decorative serpent heads shown in profile modeled after sculptures found at Ancient Aztec temples, and arranges these elements into a conceptually layered manner.

Filiberto Perez, Serpiente Emplumada, 2014

Filiberto Perez, Serpiente Emplumada, 2014

Fatima Shakil is a trained miniature painter from Pakistan who received an MFA from Stony Brook University. In her works Tangible Memories I – III, she combines her interest in miniatures and textile design most notably inspired by Persian carpets. Shakil symbolically weaves memories of her past through individual strands of Wasli paper, a traditional miniaturist material invented in South Asia.

Fatima Shakil, Tangible III, 2014

Fatima Shakil, Tangible III, 2014

Richard Smith received his formal education in Britain during the 1950s, a time when the debate between the non-objective art of the Abstract Expressionists and the influence of the consumer oriented British Pop Art was in the minds of young artists. Smith developed an art that occupied the space between the two mindsets, taking in all the formal visual aspects of consumer products, and incorporating them into field painting. In Portrait, the shape of the canvas resembles that of a crushed cigarette pack. Aided by the silhouette self portrait of the artist, complete with cigarette in mouth, it becomes obvious which consumer product the artist is referring to. Smith fuses together these elements with his signature formal imagery. Repeated bands of yellow, orange, red, and blue, are painted across the canvases in a random manner, expanding the work past the picture plane.

Richard Smith, Self Portrait, 1997

Richard Smith, Portrait, 1997

In her installation, Across the Pond, British artist Annemarie Waugh recalls the many idioms and phrases of the British English language. Phrases commonly used by the artist in England while growing up, have fallen on deaf ears here in the U.S., replaced by a different group of locutions. Like a dictionary, Waugh presents the viewer with a variety of British phrases along with their definition, allowing the American viewer to finally understand the foreign expressions. Ultimately she seeks to reconcile her position between two similar but varied cultures.

Annemarie Waugh, Across the Pond Series: Throw a Wobbly, 2014

Annemarie Waugh, Across the Pond Series: Throw a Wobbly, 2014

Multi-media artist, Shirley Wegner reconstructs landscapes of her childhood in Israel through paintings, photographs and installations. In her print Explosion with Road, Wegner examines the relationship between fact and fiction. She reconstructs Israeli landscapes from memory offering a comparison between childhood reminiscences and contemporary landscapes of urban decay, natural disasters, and the aftermath of war. Wegner addresses notions of identity, nostalgia, and the mechanisms of territory.

Shirley Wegner, Explosion with Road, 2012

Shirley Wegner, Explosion with Road, 2012

Remembering Things Past brings together a collection of artists from different parts of the world. Each artist has unique memories and experiences of their home country that are incorporated into his or her art. Remembering Things Past is a traveling exhibition, expanding from an exhibit previously shown at the Patchogue Arts Gallery this past November – December.

Jay Schuck & John Cino, Curators

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Remembering Things Past, Part II

THIS ESSAY HAS BEEN PUBLISHED IN THE FEBRUARY 2015 EDITION OF ACES MAGAZINE

Now on view at the Islip Art Museum is Remembering Things Past, which features foreign-born artists that are presently living and working in the United States. The artists presented in the exhibition arrived at different points in their lives and at different stages in their artistic career. Remembering Things Past is an expansion of an exhibition previously shown at the Patchogue Arts Gallery this past November – December. This article focuses on the artists Anti Liu, Meleko Mokgosi, Jason Paradis, Filiberto Perez, Richard Smith, and Annemarie Waugh. To read more about Linda Abadjian, Pablo Caviedes, Cui Fei, Ana Golici, Fatima Shakil, and Shirley Wegner, please refer to the December 2014 issue of ACES Magazine.

Taiwanese artist Anti Liu grew up in a time when war between China and Taiwan seemed immanent. After completing a BFA at the National Taiwan University of Arts, he came to America where he pursued his MFA studies from Long Island University. Liu’s work pokes fun at current events and today’s political climate, recognizing the severity of these issues while presenting them in a playful manner. His sculpture fuses his Asian heritage with pop culture imagery of the West.

Anti Liu, Gold Figure, 2013

Anti Liu, Gold Figure, 2013

Interdisciplinary artist Meleko Mokgosi creates large-scale project-based installations. His text-based series, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages, addresses the problematic re-inscriptions of colonial discourse. The base of each panel consists of printed text documents resembling large-scale traditional museum labels of African based artifacts, apparently looted during colonization. The artist then adds notes and revisions to the labels, discussing an alternative, more native view of how these conceptual objects entered Western institutions.

Meleko Mokgosi, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages III, 2012 - 2014

Meleko Mokgosi, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages III, 2012 – 2014

In his artwork, Canadian born Jason Paradis incorporates memories of his time in the vast northern wilderness. In Dead Man’s Bay, the artist presents the viewer with a star constellation the artist would have seen while gazing out at the nighttime sky while on a camping trip. Like natural constellations in the sky, the painting inspires a feeling that there is something much larger in existence than our immediate world.

Jason Paradis, Dead Man's Bay, 2011

Jason Paradis, Dead Man’s Bay, 2011

With his artwork, Filiberto Perez takes a critical view on social, political issues found in the States and his native Mexico as he strives to deconstruct long held cultural beliefs. In his work Serpiente Emplumada he takes on subject of the Feathered Serpent, a divine creature rooted in prehistoric Mesoamerican societies. Here, the artist takes familiar visual symbols of the serpent, such as the decorative serpent heads shown in profile modeled after sculptures found at Ancient Aztec temples, and arranges these elements into a conceptually layered manner.

Filiberto Perez, Serpiente Emplumada, 2014

Filiberto Perez, Serpiente Emplumada, 2014

Richard Smith received his formal education in Britain during the 1950s, a time when the debate between the non-objective art of the Abstract Expressionists and the influence of the consumer oriented British Pop Art was in the minds of young artists. Smith developed an art that occupied the space between the two mindsets, taking in all the formal visual aspects of consumer products, incorporating them into his field paintings. In Self Portrait, the shape of the canvas resembles that of a crushed cigarette pack. Aided by the silhouette self portrait of the artist, complete with cigarette in mouth, it becomes obvious which consumer product the artist is referring to. Smith fuses together these elements with his signature formal imagery. Repeated bands of yellow, orange, red, and blue, are painted across the canvases in a random manner, expanding the work past the picture plane.

Richard Smith, Self Portrait, 1997

Richard Smith, Self Portrait, 1997

In her installation, Across the Pond, British artist Annemarie Waugh recalls the many idioms and phrases of the British English language. Phrases commonly used by the artist in England while growing up, have fallen on deaf ears here in the U.S., replaced by a different group of locutions. Like a dictionary, Waugh presents the viewer with a variety of British phrases along with their definition, allowing the American viewer to finally understand the foreign expressions.

Annemarie Waugh, Across the Pond Series: Throw a Wobbly, 2014

Annemarie Waugh, Across the Pond Series: Throw a Wobbly, 2014

Remembering Things Past brings together a collection of artists from different parts of the world. Each artist has unique memories and experiences of their home country that are incorporated into his or her art. The exhibition is on display at the Islip Art Museum from January 18 – March 29, 2015 and runs in conjunction with the exhibition Alexander Percy: The Texture of Color on display in the Museum Store. A reception will be held for both exhibitions on Sunday, February 8, from 1 – 4pm at the Islip Art Museum.

Jay Schuck & John Cino, Co-Curators

Remembering Things Past at Patchogue Arts Gallery

Remembering Things Past
Curated by John Cino & Jay Schuck
November 8 – December 20, 2014

Published in the December 2014 Issue of ACES Magazine

Now on view at the Patchogue Arts Gallery is Remembering Things Past, which features foreign-born artists that are presently living and working in the United States. The six artists presented in the exhibition arrived at different points in their lives and at different stages in their artistic career. Linda Abadjian and Shirley Wegner offer reconstructed memories of past experiences; Ana Golici and Pablio Caviedes reflect on aspects of native ideology, while Cui Fei and Fatima Shakil present meditations on formal aspects of design.

One artist, Linda Abadjian, arrived in 1984 as a child escaping the long fought Lebanese Civil War. Her body of work exhibited here was created after the artist’s first trip back to Lebanon in 2005. The bombed out buildings, interior scenes, and landscapes of the country reflect the state of her childhood home which has fallen into a state of disrepair. Upon returning from Lebanon Abidjian was moved to work in a new way by drawing with her opposite hand. Despite exposing the destruction of war in her mixed media works, Abadjian examines a new hope for the future rising from the ashes of its war-torn past.

Linda Abadjian, View From My Parent's Bedroom, 2006

Linda Abadjian, View From My Parent’s Bedroom, 2006

In her paintings, photographs, and installations, Shirley Wegner reconstructs landscapes of her childhood in Israel. The series Nowheres consist of 15 small landscape paintings that incorporates everyday objects the artist has at her disposal. She constructs these Israeli landscapes from memory offering a comparison between childhood reminiscences and contemporary landscapes of urban decay, natural disasters, and the aftermath of war. Wegner addresses notions of identity, nostalgia, and the mechanisms of territory.

Shirley Wegner, Nowheres XI, 2012 - 2014

Shirley Wegner, Nowheres XI, 2012 – 2014

Although she has lived in the United States for the past 36 years, Ana Golici still follows current events in Romania. In her series of prints, entitled Icon I – V, she expresses her opinions on the current political climate of her home country. Inspired by traditional Christian icon paintings popular in Eastern Europe since the Middle Ages, Golici mounts her microscopic imagery of biological forms in the traditional gilded icon frames. The biologic imagery and its reflective quality stand for the corrupt political system that governs her home country.

Ana Golici, Icon III, 2014

Ana Golici, Icon III, 2014

Pablo Caviedes received his formal education in Ecuador before coming to the United States. His skull and bone sculptures find the artist recalling past experiences of collecting animal bones while exploring the Andes Mountains. These old bones, polished by time and nature, sparked Caviedes’ artistic interest by offering the deceased creature new life in art. One assemblage, Looking South, consists of a fractured cow skull the artist reconstructs with resin, adding unrealistic elements that are seamlessly incorporated.

Pablio Caviedes, Looking South, 1999

Pablio Caviedes, Looking South, 1999

Cui Fei earned a BFA from Zhejian Academy of Fine Arts in China before receiving a MFA from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in the United States. As a Chinese artist active in the United States, she witnessed the rapid social changes taking place in China from afar while having to adapt to a radically new American culture. Her installation Manuscript of Nature fuses the Chinese conception of nature, which emphasizes interconnectedness of all living creatures, with the Western theory of Transculturalism, the notion of finding oneself within all human cultures.

Cui Fei, Manuscript of Nature (detail), 2014

Cui Fei, Manuscript of Nature (detail), 2014

Fatima Shakil is a trained miniature painter from Pakistan who recently received an MFA from Stony Brook University. In her pieces Tangible Memories I – III, she combines her interest in miniatures and textile design most notably inspired by Persian carpets. Shakil symbolically weaves memories of her past through individual strands of Wasli paper, a traditional miniaturist material invented in South Asia.

Fatima Shakil, Tangible III, 2014

Fatima Shakil, Tangible Memories III, 2014

Remembering Things Past brings together a collection of artists from different parts of the world. Each artist has unique memories and experiences of their home country that are incorporated into his or her art. The exhibition is on display at the Patchogue Arts Gallery from November 8 – December 20, 2014. An expanded version of the exhibition will be on view at the Islip Art Museum from January 18 through March 29, 2015.

The Patchogue Arts Gallery is a professional art gallery operated by the Patchogue Arts Council, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation founded in 2008 to promote, encourage, and support the arts on the greater south shore of the Town of Brookhaven. The gallery features five curated exhibitions per year, which reflect current issues and concerns in the contemporary art world, in additional to an annual juried members exhibition.

Jay Schuck & John Cino, Co-Curators

Remembering Things Past4