Andrea del Sarto: Creative Process Examined

In conjunction with the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Frick Collection will present Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action, the first major monographic exhibition of the artist’s oeuvre in the United States. According to the institution, the exhibition assembles three paintings along with some fifty related drawings, which showcases the artist’s creative process. The artwork borrowed for this exhibition comes from institutions such as the Louvre, the Palazzo Pitti, and the British Museum.

From 1515 until his death, Andrea del Sarto (1486 – 1530) ran one of the most productive workshops in Florence during the height of the Italian Renaissance. A contemporary of Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael, del Sarto’s artwork encompasses the Florentine ideals of design and draftsmanship, and has influenced generations of artists after his death. Falling into obscurity in the early 18th century, del Sarto is well regarded amongst scholars and collectors but remains relatively unknown to the general public. Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action brings del Sarto back into the public eye, offering museumgoers a glimpse into the artist’s workshop and artistic process.

  • Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action, The Frick Collection, New York, 7 October, 2015 – 10 January, 2016
Andrea del Sarto, Portrait of a Young Man (c. 1517), © The National Gallery, London

Andrea del Sarto, Portrait of a Young Man (c. 1517)
© The National Gallery, London

NEA Sculptures at Dowling College

THIS ESSAY WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE OCTOBER 2015 ISSUE OF ACES MAGAZINE

Dowling College was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts grant for “Arts Engagement in American Communities” through the efforts of the Department of Visual Arts, Graphic Design, and Digital Arts. This prestigious award granted the department to fund four site-specific interactive sculptures that are on fixtures at the College’s Oakdale campus. The project, titled Sculptural Interactions @ Idle Hour, was spearheaded by Professors Loretta Corbisiero and Stephen Lamia, Ph.D. and includes artists Pam Brown, Lorrie Fredette, Beth Giacummo-Lachacz, and Vera Manzi-Schacht. Each sculptor experiments with the formal elements of expression, while incorporating the College’s historic Vanderbilt Idle Hour Estate architecture into their work. The exhibition explores the impact visual arts has on community development and on education.

Pam Brown, Skyward, 2015

Pam Brown, Skyward, 2015

Constructed from steel and painted bright red, Pam Brown’s Skyward stands tall among the natural trees and shrubbery on the campus grounds. The 21 foot tall steel beam stands as an industrialized interpretation of nature by using manmade materials to mimic the natural world.

Lorrie Fredette, Common Carrier, 2015

Lorrie Fredette, Common Carrier, 2015

Fusing science and art together, Lorrie Fredette’s installation Common Carrier is prompted by diseases and viruses that plagues modern society. Taking leads from environmental and medical news headlines, Fredette conducts research and compiles images that are then altered, subverted, and distorted. Mimicking a beehive and situated near the Kramer Science Center on campus, Fredette’s installation is nestled high in an interior space, hanging precariously above the ground. Constructed from hand-stitched unbleached cotton muslin over brass frames and coated with a layer of beeswax and tree resin, Common Carrier latches onto its environment just as a virus infiltrates one’s immune system, clinging onto its host for survival.

Lorrie Fredette, Common Carrier, 2015

Lorrie Fredette, Common Carrier, 2015

In her current body of work, Beth Giacummo-Lachacz strives to visually translate the function and production of steroid hormones that influence the sexual development of organisms. Her interactive inflatable installation, which stands anywhere from 25 to 30 feet tall, Per Abbracciare e Tenere (To Hug and to Hold) explores ideas of community through art as an experience and the physiological effects of physical contact through abstracted forms that simulate the notion of embrace. The lighting and olfactory elements of the installation creates a multisensory sensation as the audience experiences the work through the five senses.

Beth Giacummo-Lachacz, Per Abbracciare e Tenere, 2015

Beth Giacummo-Lachacz, Per Abbracciare e Tenere, 2015

Consisting of three parts, Vera Manzi-Schacht’s installation Luminosity and Liminality explores the experience of time itself in space. Enveloped by natural light and the portal entrance into the chamber sits Esclarmonde, the life-sized terracotta sculpture whose name translates “to enlighten the world” from Medieval French. During the Medieval period, a time of great social and political turmoil, Esclarmonde stood as a symbol of justice, truth, spiritual life, and freedom. The ever present sculpture remains stationary as light continuous cycles through the room over the course of the year stands representative of the continued presence of justice and freedom in an ever-changing world.

Vera Manzi-Schacht, Luminosity and Liminality, 2015

Vera Manzi-Schacht, Luminosity and Liminality, 2015

With the National Endowment for the Arts grant, Dowling College was able to execute a sculptural exhibition that widens the public’s engagement and interest in site-specific artwork. The exhibition promotes academic discourse through learning and strengthens the impact the visual arts have higher education and on the community at large.

Beth Giacummo-Lachacz, Per Abbracciare e Tenere, 2015

Beth Giacummo-Lachacz, Per Abbracciare e Tenere, 2015

Sculptural Interactions @ Idle Hour, curated by Loretta Corbisiero and Stephen Lamia, Ph.D., is now on view at Dowling College. A companion exhibition, The Making of Sculptural Interactions @ Idle Hour, is on display at Dowling College’s Anthony Giordano Gallery until November 1, and features preparatory drawings, models and more from Brown, Fredette, Giacummo-Lachacz, and Manzi-Schacht.

Jay Schuck
Arts Writer

Photo credits
Professor Jennifer Formica and Dowling College students Amanda Fitcher and Gina Nicola

Source Material
Corbisiero, Loretta, and Stephen Lamia, Ph.D., Sculptural Interactions @ Idle Hour. Oakdale, NY: Dowling College, 2015, Print.

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Italian Renaissance Classes at Islip Art Museum

CALL ISLIP ART MUSEUM TO REGISTER
631-224-5402

Intro to Art History: Venetian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck
A foundation course designed for those with little to no prior knowledge of art history. This course is designed for those interested in the art produced in Northern Italy, specifically Venice, during the 14th– 16th centuries. Venetian artwork differs from their central Italian counterparts as the style blends together Byzantine, Islamic, & Western traditions and favors color over line. The course will explore the work of Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Paolo Veronese, & more.

Mondays: 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Session A: September 21, 28, October 5, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

Gentile Bellini, Processione in piazza San Marco, c. 1496, Oil on canvas, 347 x 770 cm., Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venice

Intro to Art History: Early Italian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck
A foundations course designed for those with little to no previous knowledge of art history. The course is designed for those with an interest in art produced in central Italy during the 13th–15th centuries, a time known as the Early Renaissance. The artists of this period are known for making a conscious break with the Gothic tradition, ushering a new artistic movement that would reach its height in the late 15th century. The course will explore the work of major artists from this period including Giotto, Massaccio, Donatello, Pierodella Francesca, Botticelli, and more.

Mondays: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Session A: September 21, 28, October 5, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
Fee: $75 (10-week session)

Masaccio, Tribute Money, 1420s, Fresco, 247 x 597 cm., Brancacci Chapel, Florence

Intro to Art History: High Italian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck
A foundation course designed for those with little knowledge of art history. The course is designed for those with an interest in art produced in central Italy   during the late 15th – 16th centuries, a time known as the High Renaissance. Artists of this period are known for their close observation of the natural world and human figures, their sophisticated use of iconography, and their innovations in composition, perspective, and design. The course acts as a continuation to the Early Italian Renaissance course and will examine the artwork of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and their contemporaries.

Mondays: 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Session A: September 21, 28, October 5, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

Michelangelo, Creation of Adam, c. 1512, Fresco, 280 x 570 cm., Sistine Chapel, Vatican City