You Are Here: Second Avenue Firehouse Gallery

On exhibit at the Second Avenue Firehouse Gallery is a series of black and white site-specific photographs by Dan Lachacz. The body of work, collectively titled You Are Here (Series 4), finds the artist using the exhibition space as his subject matter, as he alters the space until it no longer appears familiar. The work is similar to site specific installations in which the artist creates a new body of work specifically for designated exhibition space. The exhibition is the fourth of its kind with Lachacz previously exhibiting his site-specific photography at the Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts, Islip Art Museum, and Roast Coffee & Tea Trading Company.

Each composition consists of multiple contrasting details that draw the viewer in as the artist juxtaposes light with dark, color with shadow, space with closure. The distorted images of unreal qualities and obscure angles create a sense of intimacy with viewer, igniting his or her desire to explore the composition and its many stimulating components. With his photographs, Lachacz presents the exhibition space from unconventional angles, perspectives, and other unique points of view. By distorting the perspective in which the venue is normally presented, he forces the viewer to re-evaluate the space he or she occupies, making the viewer conscious of his or her surroundings.

The symmetrically composed Site-Specific Photograph #20 depicts the Second Avenue Firehouse Gallery from the back wall at ground level. The horizon line cuts the picture in half with the lower half depicting the glimmering hardwood floor which reflects the light that enters the space from both sides of the work. The vanishing point of the photograph can be found in the center of the composition, underneath the wooden bench found in the background. The paneled walls of the gallery are left vacant and the tracking lighting has been turned off. Two pedestals can be found on either side of the composition in different corners of the room with a half-sized desk cabinet found in front of the one on the left. Two empty chairs sitting opposite on another in the mid-ground, and behind them, on the left-hand side, is another desk cabinet, while a folding table sits behind the one on the right; further enhancing the overall equilibrium of the piece. Within the work, the viewer will be able to find several objects Lachacz uses for the subject of his other photographs.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #20, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #20, 2015

The chair on the right-hand side of the previous image becomes a primary feature in Site-Specific Photograph #16. Situated between the wall and the back of the chair, Lachacz snaps his picture. The viewer is instantly aware of the geometric shapes of the composition, such as the right triangle formed by the wall, chair, and bottom edge of the picture. Here the artist juxtaposes clarity with the obscure, as seen in sharpness of the floorboards against the blurred wall panels.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #16, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #16, 2015

Similarly, Site-Specific Photograph #1 offers a unique viewpoint of the exhibition space. Here the viewer finds the upper section of the distorted ventilation shaft composed against the highly focused wall-based air vent. This portion of the gallery would commonly go overlooked by the typical art lover whose attention would be solely on the artwork that hangs on the gallery walls.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #1, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #1, 2015

This section of the gallery is found in another of Lachacz’s photographs, Site-Specific Photograph #22. Here the artist offers his view a truly distinct point of view that the viewer would not have otherwise seen on his or her own. The artist’s camera is situated slanted on the top of the ventilation shaft so the room as a whole is turned on a 45-degree angle. The barrel of the filter unit recedes into space where the viewer finds one of the rack lighting units. Through these photographs, Lachacz offers the viewer a unique perspective of the exhibition space, one he or she would not have been privy to otherwise.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #22, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #22, 2015

The ceiling of the Second Avenue Firehouse Gallery is the focus of two of Lacahcz’s photographs. One, Site Specific Photograph #3 depicts one of the gallery’s two tracking lighting units, although only two track lights can be found on opposite sides of the image. The composition is noted for its vertical and horizontal lines as the lighting track runs across the visual plane, dividing the top third of the picture from the lower two-thirds.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #3, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #3, 2015

Perplexed by the highest parameters of the gallery, another work by Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #18, presents the ceiling from a dizzying angular view. Sunlight shines off the track lights, reflecting onto the ceiling. By using the ceiling as the subject for these works, Lachacz challenges the viewer to fully be aware of their surroundings, taking in scenery he or she may have otherwise overlooked.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #18, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #18, 2015

In many of his pictures, the imperfects of the exhibition space are the subjects. Site Specific Photograph #11, depicts the base of the gallery’s ceiling fan. The finely polished surface is tarnished with smeared paint that has long since dried, as a single electrical wire loops out between the base of the fan and ceiling. The surface around the fixture is roughly spackled and painted when compared to the remaining sections of ceiling found within the image.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #11, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #11, 2015

Site-Specific Photograph #6, offers almost no point of reference to the exhibition on it’s own. Without the aid of the other photographs in the exhibition, or without firsthand knowledge of the Second Avenue Firehouse Gallery, it would be almost impossible for the viewer to pinpoint the setting of this picture, which depicts a stained section between what can either be wall or ceiling panels.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #6, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #6, 2015

Every little detail of the space is worthy of the artist’s attention. The subject of Site-Specific Photograph #4 appears to be the long nail that is situated in a pilaster that frames an adjacent window. The ornate architectural element is situated just to the right of the composition with the window blind occupying the lower left-hand corner. Again, the various geometrical shaped formed by the architectural elements and objects take prominence over the scene. The concentric circles found within the squared capital of the pilaster forms a nice juxtaposition as the long, narrow, blackened nail offers a compelling contrast against the various whites and grays found within the picture.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #4, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #4, 2015

Likewise, Site-Specific Photograph #5, features an often-overlooked aspect in many galleries, the light switch. Three-quarters of the picture plane consist of a close up of two wall panels. The horizontal lines are greeted by the darkened light-switch which spots the words “vari.” As indicated by the knob, and the track lighting from other images, the switch is turned to the off position. On the left-hand side of the object, one finds a dried-up pool of white paint, a detail so minute, it would have gone overlooked by the average person, if not designated by the artist. By highlighting the insignificantly overlooked aspects of the gallery, Lachacz turns the attention of the viewer not only to his photographs, but the exhibition space as he challenges his audience to be aware of his or her surroundings.

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #5, 2015

Dan Lachacz, Site-Specific Photograph #5, 2015

Lachacz is an active member of the Patchogue Arts Council and is a founding member of the Patchogue Arts Council’s Photographers Group. He is the Assistant Director of New York Contemporary Artists Symposium (NYCAS) and Co-President of Criterion Contemporary. He is a 2010 alumnus of the New York Foundation for the Arts’ (NYFA) MARK program and has had his artwork exhibited nationally and internationally by the East End Arts Council, Phoenix Gallery, Patchogue Arts Gallery, Islip Art Museum, Center for Visual Arts, and the Museum of Satu Mare in Romania.

You Are Here (Series 4) is on display at the Second Avenue Firehouse Gallery in Bay Shore, NY from May 18 – June 20, 2015 with a reception held on Saturday, June 19, from 7 – 9 PM.

Jay Schuck
Essayist

Dan_Firehouse_Series4_YouAreHere_2

Pastel Landscapes by Linda Beckerman

THIS ESSAY HAS BEEN PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 2015 ISSUE OF ACES MAGAZINE

Now on display in the PAC Members Gallery at Roast Coffee and Tea Trading Co. is a series of pastel paintings by Linda Beckerman. The pastel paintings in this exhibition represent her attraction to the landscape of Long Island, as Beckerman captures the mystique and serenity of the natural world around her. Several themes run through Beckerman’s paintings such as the changing colors of nature through the seasons, the reflective properties of water, and man’s diminished presence in the natural world.

A prominent source of inspiration for the artist is the tranquil setting of Frank Melville Memorial Park in East Setauket. In her painting Setauket Pond, nearly two-thirds of the composition depicts the reflective surface of the placid pool of water. The arched, man-made bridge and bank of land act as a barrier between the pond in the foreground and the distant band of treetops in the background. The densely colored foliage and shrubbery transports the viewer to late spring, feeling the warmth of the sun as they engage in a leisurely nature walk through the park.

Linda Beckerman, Setauket Pond, 1993

Linda Beckerman, Setauket Pond, 1993

Moreover, the park serves as the setting for another one of her paintings, Setauket Pond with Ducks. The predominate colors of the painting – yellow, blue, and green – invoke the feeling of late summer or early fall, as the leaves begin to turn orange in the far left-hand side. Along with Beckerman, the viewers observe, undisturbed, a small group of ducks as they take a moment from swimming to rest on a small mound of sand that juts above the surface of the pond.

Linda Beckerman, Setauket Pond with Ducks, 1993

Linda Beckerman, Setauket Pond with Ducks, 1993

All four seasons are on display in Beckerman’s work. As the title suggests, Red Barn – Winter, captures a typical Long Island winter day. Snow has fallen, covering the red barn in white. A winding path in the snow has been shoveled away, connecting the barn to a point beyond the lower section of the composition. The mid-level horizon line and overall perspective of the composition allows the viewer to feel that one is standing within this shoveled path, which helps draw the viewer into the work.

Linda Beckerman, Red Barn - Winter, 1993

Linda Beckerman, Red Barn – Winter, 1993

Humble manmade structures, such as the ever-present arched bridge found in many of these works, or the small house in Setauket Pond with House, are overpowered by the natural world, as foliage grows wildly around the structures. In the foreground, the simmering body of water captures and replicates the rich greens of the vegetation.

Linda Beckerman, Setauket Pond with House, 1993

Linda Beckerman, Setauket Pond with House, 1993

Beckerman is a multi-disciplined artist, currently living in Patchogue, NY. She is the Executive Director of the multicultural arts organization Worldwide Voices, and Vice President of the multi-lingual publishing corporation Heartworks International, Inc. Beckerman has exhibited her artwork across Long Island.

The Patchogue Arts Council is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation founded in 2008 to promote, encourage, and support the arts on the greater south shore of the Town of Brookhaven. The Patchogue Arts Council and Roast Coffee and Tea Trading Company created the PAC Members Gallery at Roast in the summer of 2013 as an alternative exhibition venue where PAC members can exhibit their artwork. In addition to exhibiting artwork and brewing award-winning coffee, Roast Coffee and Tea Trading Co. hosts weekly open mic nights on Tuesdays and Fridays and a monthly poetry night on the first Saturday of every month. Pastel Landscapes by Linda Beckerman is on display at the PAC Members Gallery at Roast from May 11 – June 22, 2015.

Jay Schuck
Exhibition Coordinator/Curator

Linda Beckerman Roast Card

Summer Art History Classes at Islip Art Museum

CALL ISLIP ART MUSEUM TO REGISTER
631-224-5402

Intro to Art History: Venetian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck
A foundation course designed for those with little to no prior knowledge of art history. This course is designed for those interested in the art produced in Northern Italy, specifically Venice, during the 14th– 16th centuries. Venetian artwork differs from their central Italian counterparts as the style blends together Byzantine, Islamic, & Western traditions and favors color over line. The course will explore the work of Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Paolo Veronese, & more.

Mondays: 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Session A: June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27, August 3
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

Gentile Bellini, Processione in piazza San Marco, c. 1496, Oil on canvas, 347 x 770 cm., Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venice

Gentile Bellini, Processione in piazza San Marco, c. 1496, Oil on canvas, 347 x 770 cm., Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice

Intro to Art History: Early Italian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck
A foundations course designed for those with little to no previous knowledge of art history. The course is designed for those with an interest in art produced in central Italy during the 13th–15th centuries, a time known as the Early Renaissance. The artists of this period are known for making a conscious break with the Gothic tradition, ushering a new artistic movement that would reach its height in the late 15th century. The course will explore the work of major artists from this period including Giotto, Massaccio, Donatello, Pierodella Francesca, Botticelli, and more.

Mondays: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Session A: June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27, August 3
Fee: $75 (10-week session)

Masaccio, Tribute Money, 1420s, Fresco, 247 x 597 cm., Brancacci Chapel, Florence

Masaccio, Tribute Money, 1420s, Fresco, 247 x 597 cm., Brancacci Chapel, Florence

Intro to Art History: High Italian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck
A foundation course designed for those with little knowledge of art history. The course is designed for those with an interest in art produced in central Italy   during the late 15th – 16th centuries, a time known as the High Renaissance. Artists of this period are known for their close observation of the natural world and human figures, their sophisticated use of iconography, and their innovations in composition, perspective, and design. The course acts as a continuation to the Early Italian Renaissance course and will examine the artwork of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and their contemporaries.

Mondays: 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Session A: June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27, August 3
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

Michelangelo, Creation of Adam, c. 1512, Fresco, 280 x 570 cm., Sistine Chapel, Vatican City

Michelangelo, Creation of Adam, c. 1512, Fresco, 280 x 570 cm., Sistine Chapel, Vatican City

Intro to Art History: Art of Northern Europe
With Jay Schuck
This course is designed for those with little to no previous knowledge of art history. The course will survey the artwork produced in Northern Europe, particularly the Netherlands, Germany, and Belgium. The course begins with the development of Early Netherlandish Art and continues to the time of the Reformation. Artists to be examined include Jan van Eyck, Petrus Christus, Albrecht Dürer, Bosch, Pieter Brueghel, and more.

Tuesdays: 6:00 p.m.—7:00 p.m.
Session A: June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, August 4
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

1280px-The_Braque_Triptych_interior

Rogier van der Weyden, The Braque Triptych (interior), c. 1542, Oil on oak, 41 x 136 cm., Musée du Louvre, Paris

Intro to Art History: Art of the Dutch Republic
With Jay Schuck
This course is designed for those with little to no previous knowledge of art history. The course will survey the artwork produced in the Dutch Republic during the 17th century, a time known as the Golden Age of Dutch Painting. The course will explore the various genres of paintings, such as portraits, landscapes, scenes of the everyday and the artists who made them. Artists to be examined include Rembrandt, Johannes Vermeer, Frans Hals, and more.

Tuesdays:   7:00 p.m.—8:00 p.m.
Session A: June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, August 4
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

Rembrandt, The Night Watch, 1632

Rembrandt, The Night Watch, 1632, Oil on canvas, 363 x 437, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam