Winter/Spring Courses at Islip Art Museum

INTRO TO ART HISTORY: The Venetian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck

Gentile Bellini, Processione in piazza San Marco, c. 1496, Oil on canvas, 347 x 770 cm., Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venice

Gentile Bellini, Processione in piazza San Marco, c. 1496, Oil on canvas, 347 x 770 cm., Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice

A foundation course designed for those with little to no prior knowledge of art history. This course is designed for those interested in the art produced in Northern Italy, specifically Venice, during the 14th– 16th centuries. Venetian artwork differs from their central Italian counterparts as the style blends together Byzantine, Islamic, & Western traditions and favors color over line. The course will explore the work of Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Paolo Veronese, & more.
Mondays: 5:00 p.m.—6:00 p.m.
Session A: March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, April, 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

INTRO TO ART HISTORY:The Early Italian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck

Masaccio, Tribute Money, 1420s, Fresco, 247 x 597 cm., Brancacci Chapel, Florence

Masaccio, Tribute Money, 1420s, Fresco, 247 x 597 cm., Brancacci Chapel, Florence

A foundations course designed for those with little to no previous knowledge of art history. The course is designed for those with an interest in art produced in central Italy during the 13th–15th centuries, a time known as the Early Renaissance. The artists of this period are known for making a conscious break with the Gothic tradition, ushering a new artistic movement that would reach its height in the late 15th century. The course will explore the work of major artists from this period including Giotto, Massaccio, Donatello, Pierodella Francesca, Botticelli, and more.
Mondays: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Session A: March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, April, 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4
Fee: $75 (10-week session)

INTRO TO ART HISTORY: High Italian Renaissance
With Jay Schuck

Michelangelo, Creation of Adam, c. 1512, Fresco, 280 x 570 cm., Sistine Chapel, Vatican City

Michelangelo, Creation of Adam, c. 1512, Fresco, 280 x 570 cm., Sistine Chapel, Vatican City

A foundation course designed for those with little knowledge of art history. The course is designed for those with an interest in art produced in central Italy during the late 15th – 16th centuries, a time known as the High Renaissance. Artists of this period are known for their close observation of the natural world and human figures, their sophisticated use of iconography, and their innovations in composition, perspective, and design. The course acts as a continuation to the Early Italian Renaissance course and will examine the artwork of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and their contemporaries.
Mondays: 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Session A: March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, April, 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

INTRO TO ART HISTORY: Art of Northern Europe
With Jay Schuck

Jan van Eyck, The Virgin and Child with Canon van der Paele, 1434 - 1436, oil on panel, 141 x 176.5 cm., Groeningemuseum, Bruges

Jan van Eyck, The Virgin and Child with Canon van der Paele, 1434 – 1436, oil on panel, 141 x 176.5 cm., Groeningemuseum, Bruges

This course is designed for those with little to no previous knowledge of art history. The course will survey the artwork produced in Northern Europe, particularly the Netherlands, Germany, and Belgium. The course begins with the development of Early Netherlandish Art and continues to the time of the Reformation. Artists to be examined include Jan van Eyck, Petrus Christus, Albrecht Dürer, Bosch, Pieter Brueghel, and more.
Tuesdays: 6:00 p.m.—7:00 p.m.
Session A: March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April, 7, 14, 21, 28, May 5
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

INTRO TO ART HISTORY: Art of the Dutch Republic
With Jay Schuck

Rembrandt, The Night Watch, 1632

Rembrandt, The Night Watch, 1642, Oil on canvas, 3.6 x 4.4 m., Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam 

This course is designed for those with little to no previous knowledge of art history. The course will survey the artwork produced in the Dutch Republic during the 17th century, a time known as the Golden Age of Dutch Painting. The course will explore the various genres of paintings, such as portraits, landscapes, scenes of the everyday and the artists who made them. Artists to be examined include Rembrandt, Johannes Vermeer, Frans Hals, and more.
Tuesdays: 7:00p.m.—8:00p.m.
Session A: March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April, 7, 14, 21, 28, May 5
Fee: $75 per session (10-week session)

TO ENROLL, CALL THE ISLIP ARTS COUNCIL AT 631-224-5402

Remembering Things Past at Islip Art Museum

On view at the Islip Art Museum is Remembering Things Past, which features foreign-born artists that are presently living and working in the United States. The artists presented in the exhibition arrived at different points in their lives and at different stages in their artistic career.

Linda Abadjian arrived in 1984 as a child escaping the long fought Lebanese Civil War. The works in the exhibition were created after the artist’s first trip back to Lebanon in 2005. The bombed out buildings, interior scenes, and landscapes of the country reflect the state of her childhood home which was damaged during the war and has fallen into disrepair. After her return and upon reflecting on her recent experience, Abadjian was moved to work in a new way and began drawing with her opposite hand. Despite exposing the destruction of war in her mixed media works, Abadjian examines a new hope for the future rising from the ashes of its war-torn past.

Linda Abadjian, Stairway to Our Playground, 2006

Linda Abadjian, Stairway to Our Playground, 2006

Pablo Caviedes received his formal education in Ecuador before coming to the United States. His skull and bone sculptures show the artist recalling past experiences of collecting animal bones while exploring the Andes Mountains. These old bones, polished by time and nature, sparked Caviedes’ artistic interest by offering the deceased creature new life in art. The works whether skull or vertebrae are embellished with resin, adding unrealistic elements that are seamlessly incorporated.

Pablo Caviedes, This Makes My Mouth Water, 1999

Pablo Caviedes, This Makes My Mouth Water, 2002

Cui Fei earned a BFA from Zhejian Academy of Fine Arts in China before receiving a MFA from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. As a Chinese artist active in the United States, she witnessed the rapid social changes taking place in China from afar while having to adapt to a radically new American culture. Her installation Manuscript of Nature, based on Chinese calligraphy, fuses the Chinese conception of nature, which emphasizes the interconnectedness of all living creatures, with the Western theory of Transculturalism, the notion of finding oneself within all human cultures.

Cui Fei, Manuscript of Nature (detail), 2014

Cui Fei, Manuscript of Nature (detail), 2014

Romanian artist Ana Golici brought with her to the United States 36 years ago, a fascination with natural forms. In her Icon series, Golici replaces the Christian iconography of traditional Eastern European icon paintings, a staple in many Romanian homes since the Middle Ages, with microscopic biological imagery in hand made gilded frames.

Ana Golici, Icon I, 2014

Ana Golici, Icon I, 2014

Taiwanese artist Anti Liu grew up in a time when war between China and Taiwan seemed imminent. After completing a BFA at the National Taiwan University of Arts, he came to America where he pursued his MFA studies at Long Island University. Liu’s work pokes fun at current events and today’s political climate, recognizing the severity of these issues while presenting them in a playful manner. His sculpture fuses his Asian heritage with pop culture imagery of the West.

Anti Liu, Baby Pillow, 2011

Anti Liu, Baby Pillow, 2011

Meleko Mokgosi’s art education straddled two continents, beginning in his native Botswana and continuing in the United States. In his text-based series, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages, he addresses the problematic re-inscriptions of colonial discourse. The series is based on the exhibition African Art, New York, and the Avant-Garde that was on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2012. Here the artist is responding to the museum labels, the primary source of information for the general public. Each panel consists of printed text resembling large-scale museum labels for African artifacts, apparently looted during colonization. The artist then adds notes and revisions to the labels, critiquing the structure in how museumgoers would understand the material.

Meleko Mokgosi, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages III, 2012 - 2014

Meleko Mokgosi, Modern Art: The Root of African Savages III, 2012 – 2014

In his artwork, Canadian born Jason Paradis incorporates memories of his time in the vast northern wilderness. In Dead Man’s Bay, the artist presents the viewer with a star constellation the artist would have seen while gazing out at the nighttime sky while on a camping trip. Like natural constellations in the sky, the painting inspires a feeling that there is something much larger in existence than our immediate world.

Jason Paradis, Dead Man's Bay, 2011

Jason Paradis, Dead Man’s Bay, 2011

Through imagery derived from Pre-Columbian sources, Mexican born artist, Filiberto Perez takes a critical view on social, political issues found in the States and his native Mexico as he strives to deconstruct long held cultural beliefs. In Serpiente Emplumada, Perez takes on the subject of the Feathered Serpent, a divine creature rooted in prehistoric Mesoamerican societies. Here, the artist takes familiar visual symbols of the serpent, such as the decorative serpent heads shown in profile modeled after sculptures found at Ancient Aztec temples, and arranges these elements into a conceptually layered manner.

Filiberto Perez, Serpiente Emplumada, 2014

Filiberto Perez, Serpiente Emplumada, 2014

Fatima Shakil is a trained miniature painter from Pakistan who received an MFA from Stony Brook University. In her works Tangible Memories I – III, she combines her interest in miniatures and textile design most notably inspired by Persian carpets. Shakil symbolically weaves memories of her past through individual strands of Wasli paper, a traditional miniaturist material invented in South Asia.

Fatima Shakil, Tangible III, 2014

Fatima Shakil, Tangible III, 2014

Richard Smith received his formal education in Britain during the 1950s, a time when the debate between the non-objective art of the Abstract Expressionists and the influence of the consumer oriented British Pop Art was in the minds of young artists. Smith developed an art that occupied the space between the two mindsets, taking in all the formal visual aspects of consumer products, and incorporating them into field painting. In Portrait, the shape of the canvas resembles that of a crushed cigarette pack. Aided by the silhouette self portrait of the artist, complete with cigarette in mouth, it becomes obvious which consumer product the artist is referring to. Smith fuses together these elements with his signature formal imagery. Repeated bands of yellow, orange, red, and blue, are painted across the canvases in a random manner, expanding the work past the picture plane.

Richard Smith, Self Portrait, 1997

Richard Smith, Portrait, 1997

In her installation, Across the Pond, British artist Annemarie Waugh recalls the many idioms and phrases of the British English language. Phrases commonly used by the artist in England while growing up, have fallen on deaf ears here in the U.S., replaced by a different group of locutions. Like a dictionary, Waugh presents the viewer with a variety of British phrases along with their definition, allowing the American viewer to finally understand the foreign expressions. Ultimately she seeks to reconcile her position between two similar but varied cultures.

Annemarie Waugh, Across the Pond Series: Throw a Wobbly, 2014

Annemarie Waugh, Across the Pond Series: Throw a Wobbly, 2014

Multi-media artist, Shirley Wegner reconstructs landscapes of her childhood in Israel through paintings, photographs and installations. In her print Explosion with Road, Wegner examines the relationship between fact and fiction. She reconstructs Israeli landscapes from memory offering a comparison between childhood reminiscences and contemporary landscapes of urban decay, natural disasters, and the aftermath of war. Wegner addresses notions of identity, nostalgia, and the mechanisms of territory.

Shirley Wegner, Explosion with Road, 2012

Shirley Wegner, Explosion with Road, 2012

Remembering Things Past brings together a collection of artists from different parts of the world. Each artist has unique memories and experiences of their home country that are incorporated into his or her art. Remembering Things Past is a traveling exhibition, expanding from an exhibit previously shown at the Patchogue Arts Gallery this past November – December.

Jay Schuck & John Cino, Curators

RTP_Invite_2015-3

Beyond Painting at Patchogue Arts Gallery

Curated by John Cino
January 10 – February 21, 2015

Since the late 15th century when painters first stretched fabric over a wood frame, the favorite format for paintings has been a rectangle. For over 400 years painters were content to use their canvases to create illusionistic images of reality. But about 100 years ago in the early days of the 20th century, some artists stopped seeing the rectangle as a window to be looked through, but as something to be looked at. They saw the opportunity to make something more real. Illusion became allusion, RE-presentation became PRESENT-ation as artist sought to make art concrete through the manipulation of materials on their rectangular surfaces.

Robert Carioscia bejewels his hand-made and found objects transforming the dross into the precious. His Reptarium Assemblages series incorporates clay, polymer paint, mirrors, glue, and plastic reptile figurines. In the compositions, the different materials are assembled in a manner that mimics actual reptiles roaming a primordial landscape seen from above.

Robert Carioscia, Cosmos, 2014

Robert Carioscia, Cosmos, 2014

Maureen Palmieri creates assemblages of found objects, which become imbued with a mystical numinosity. Her installation, Candlewall, examines the manipulation of wax as a medium, how it will lose its form in intense heat and subsequently harden into a different shape.

Maureen Palmieri, Candlewall, 2014

Maureen Palmieri, Candlewall (detail), 2014

Alexander Percy’s paintings examine the materiality of paint and its subsequent forms and shapes, turning it into a sculptural medium. Color becomes object in high relief, as expressionistic surfaces capture a particular feeling inspired by the different pigments.

Alexander Percy, Evolution of a Strange Yellow, 2011

Alexander Percy, Evolution of a Strange Yellow, 2011

Ted Stametelos builds intuitive surfaces in a variety of materials, which then become the substrate for color explorations. His works may include elements of symbolism and make references to the origins of language and interpersonal communication.

Ted Stamatelos

Ted Stamatelos, Origin of Language (detail), 2013

Felicitas Wetter prints non-objective monotypes, which are then torn into pieces. The prints are then reconstructed, often with architectonic or mythic significance, to enhance the viewer’s interpretation. Through this process of reconstruction and referencing past cultures and believes, the artist perhaps is contemplating man’s durability in the world – creating something new from remnants of the past.

Felicitas Wetter

Felicitas Wetter, Untitled (detail), 2013

The artistic process of the five artists in Beyond Painting each began with a traditional rectangular format and have found his or her own way to create a concrete reality through tactile surfaces.

– John Cino & Jay Schuck

Beyond Painting PAC